Covid-19

More evidence that Covid-19 is a disease of clotting

A paper appeared yesterday in The New England Journal of Medicine, adding to the growing body of evidence that clotting is a prominent feature in Covid-19, even if it isn’t always evident. People who develop difficulty breathing with influenza (“the flu”) or more run-of-the-mill pneumonias may look at first like they have similar shortness of breath to those with Covid-19, but this particular study details autopsy results of careful examination of the lungs in patients who have died from Covid-19 versus patients who have succumbed to influenza. The article can be accessed by clicking here.

For those without medical or scientific backgrounds, articles in The New England Journal can be difficult to decipher because of the medical terminology. However, it is worth translating for the public.

Perhaps the two sentences in the abstract (the brief summary of the study presented at the beginning of the paper to gain an overview) that stand out the most to me are: “Histologic analysis of pulmonary vessels in patients with Covid-19 showed widespread thrombosis with microangiopathy. Alveolar capillary microthrombi were 9 times as prevalent in patients with Covid-19 as in patients with influenza.”

Translation: The lungs of the patients who died secondary to Covid-19 had wide-spread clotting, nine times more blood clots and blockages in the thousands of small capillaries and blood vessels in their lungs, compared with the lungs of patients who died from influenza.

This could be why patients with Covid-19 go from talking to their healthcare providers in emergency departments to abruptly dying, and why so many who are on mechanical ventilators still don’t do well. It’s difficult to ventilate lungs that are full of blood clots. How can oxygen and carbon dioxide pass across the walls of blood vessels if these blood vessels are solidly, unabashedly blocked and blood is not flowing?

We have heard reports about young people with Covid-19 showing up with strokes. Reports of blood clots in arms/legs/fingers/toes are becoming more prevalent. This recent study confirms evidence at the cellular level that clotting is a feature of Covid-19.

Stroke emerging as complication of Covid-19

On April 28, 2020, a letter published in the New England Journal of Medicine describing blood clots in large arteries supplying the brain (known as “large-vessel strokes”) in young patients testing positive for Covid-19 brought media attention to this particular facet of a disease physicians, healthcare providers, and researchers are endeavoring to understand. (Click here to read the brief NEJM letter.) The letter’s authors have been treating patients with Covid-19 in the Mount Sinai Health System in New York City. They note that, on average, every two weeks their hospitals typically encounter 0.73 patients with large-vessel strokes who are under the age of 50, but within a two week period, they encountered five, and all were Covid-19 positive. It’s a small sample size, but the trend is concerning.

As time passes and more information is published about what this disease looks like in its various presentations, it seems to start in many patients as a respiratory illness, but when patients become ill with it, it is because it has transitioned into a disease involving blood clots and/or severe inflammation within the arteries. Report after report has emerged of patients who are awake and talking with emergency medicine physicians and healthcare providers, who then quite suddenly go into cardiac arrest and die. Stories of patients losing limbs and fingers/toes due to blood clots are emerging. Lungs are full of blood clots (pulmonary emboli) in many patients. Stroke is yet another complication of blood that easily and readily clots when the brain is the organ on the receiving end of that impact.

And now children, who were initially thought to be safe from Covid-19, with “mild” or no symptoms initially, are being reported as developing inflammation within their arteries and going into heart failure, in what is similar to a syndrome known as Kawasaki disease.

(Click here for a good mainstream media article summarizing various effects of Covid-19 in layman’s language.)

As for my own patients – what I am personally hearing from people who have experienced strokes in the past who have been infected more recently with Covid-19 is that they seem to be losing the progress they made previously through rehabilitation and time. Old stroke symptoms from their prior brain injuries are rearing their ugly heads again, and deficits that they thought were in their rearview mirrors have now arisen again. This can happen after a stroke with any bodily infection, whether it is a urinary tract infection or pneumonia, and is called recrudescence.

As businesses begin the reopening process, we are still seeing tens of thousands of new cases emerging daily in the United States, and the death count in this nation now exceeds 78,000. Mind you, this is the death count. We’re not talking about patients who survive Covid-19 with long-term scarring in their lungs, or those who have suffered limb amputations or disability associated with strokes. We also still do not know what the long-term toll of this disease is. It was only about seven months ago that this virus began infecting human beings, and we really don’t know what the long-term effects will look like a year, five years, or ten years down the road.

I’m not trying to be unnecessarily alarmist or cause panic. I care about our economy. I deeply care about jobs, livelihoods, and businesses. But as a physician, I am being real.

I also know that people who need to get back to work will not be successful in the work place long-term if they are trying to recover from the aftermath of strokes, or if they have long-term breathing problems because of the lung damage they have sustained. I am looking at the Covid-19 pandemic as a long-term battle, and do not want all of the sacrifices that have been made to fight it to be in vain if/when it just keeps returning.

I mentioned in my previous blog post that Dr. Anthony Fauci announced to the press in March that models were projecting deaths of 100,000 to 240,000 people in the US, and reporters argued with him in disbelief. They didn’t like it. They didn’t accept it. He basically said he hoped for a better outcome, but the numbers were what they were. We are getting closer to this estimated range each day.

We can feel emotionally impassioned, bored, scared, or beyond ready to resume life as we knew it only a few months ago.

But unfortunately, viruses don’t play by our rules.